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Thyme

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Thyme

Use thyme in healing or for restfulness.

Image by Alasdair Thomson/E+/Getty Images

Thyme was called thymos by the Greeks, which meant "fumigate" or "smoke". They associated thyme with valor in battle, and the restoration of physical power. Roman soldiers were known to bathe in a decoction of thyme before going into combat, to boost strength and courage. The Sumerians used it as an antiseptic, and in Egypt, thyme was one of the herbs which was used in the mummification process. Herbalist Nicolas Culpepper recommends using thyme as a treatment for whooping cough.

In The Good Herb, Judith Benn Hurley says that the oil found in thyme, called thymol, has "antiseptic and antibacterial properties." She also points out that thyme is popular with aromatherapists because of its ability to heal respiratory ailments and coughs.

Thyme can be used in healing rituals, or to bring about restful sleep. Women who wear thyme on their person are irresistible to men, and carrying sprigs in your pocket aids in developing your psychic abilities. You can create a magical broom using thyme, to banish negativity, or burn some in a bowl to help boost your courage before confrontations.

In some cultures, thyme is associated with the land of the fae -- supposedly the wee folk like to hide in the plant's leafy branches.

Other Names: Common thyme, garden thyme
Gender: Feminine
Element: Water
Planetary Connection: Venus

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