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Teaching Others

What to Know Before You Become a Pagan Teacher

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Teaching Others

Are you qualified to share what you know with others?

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At some point in your spiritual journey, you may feel that you've learned enough to share your knowledge with others. Perhaps other people have approached you and asked you to teach a class or lead a group. It's indeed possible that your life experience and studying has put you in a position where you can take on this responsibility. Perhaps you're even thinking about forming your own coven. However, before you commit to such a big undertaking, you may need to take a few things into consideration.

First, think about whether the knowledge you have is enough to teach a class or lead a group. Do you understand basic ritual format and spell construction? More importantly, are you capable of teaching this information to others in a way that is understandable, without dumbing it down? Can you demonstrate the things you teach, or do you have to rely on just reading from a book?

Next, think about whether or not you're someone people will respect as a teacher. Are you living a magical life each day? Are you just talking the talk, or are you walking the walk? Often, in the Pagan community, we see people who claim to have vast acres of esoteric knowledge, and yet they're unhappy, living in squalor, and unable to cast their way out of a paper sack -- would you take lessons from someone like this? What can you possibly learn from someone who can't get their own act together? Make sure that you are able to be someone students look up to.

Do you have enough patience to teach? For some people, teaching may mean having to explain the same concept seven different ways to the same person. Can you do this, without screaming, "You're an idiot!" at someone who asks a question over and over again? Are you capable of being selective in taking on students, or will you teach anyone who asks you to do so?

One of the most important things to keep in mind is the question of why you want to teach. Really, what will you get out of it? Are you interested in teaching because you'd like to have people following you around and hanging on your every word? Do you want to lead classes because you have a need for validation and back-patting from others? Or is it simply the case that there is a need in your community, and you feel called to get involved? Do you believe that you can do some good by helping others on their spiritual journey?

Finally, remember that there is an investment of your time and energy in teaching and leading. Selene K., a Wiccan High Priestess from Maine says, "For each hour-long ritual I lead, I spend about five hours in preparation. If I'm teaching a class, I might put in anywhere from ten to fifteen hours of prep time -- and that's for a two-hour lesson!"

Ultimately, not everyone is capable of teaching -- and that's okay. The important thing to remember is that just because you've begun teaching doesn't mean it's time to stop learning. Share what you know, help others on their path, and most importantly, never stop growing yourself. It's this last bit that will help you become a teacher truly worthy of the name.

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  3. Paganism / Wicca
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  5. Teaching Others - Are You Ready to Be a Pagan Teacher? - What to Know Before You Become a Teacher

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